Features

Meet the Microbes!

Meet the Microbes!

Written by Annoj Thavalingam Header image courtesy of NIH Just like people, microbes come in all varieties, too many to keep count. The eleven haikus below appreciate the far-reaching impact they exert upon human health, and remind us that regardless of our plight on Earth, […]

On the nature of the PhD and learning to be a scientist

On the nature of the PhD and learning to be a scientist

written by Dr. Justin Nodwell illustration by Dr. Nikko Torres September, 1986. I am a rotation student visiting a lab in the Medical Sciences Building here at the University of Toronto. Students are gathered

Using Physical Techniques To Solve Biological Problems: Professor Lewis Kay Wins the Gairdner

Using Physical Techniques To Solve Biological Problems: Professor Lewis Kay Wins the Gairdner

Written by Anastassia Pogoutse Artwork by Nikko Torres The Canada Gairdner International Award is given yearly to five individuals for outstanding contributions to medical science. 84 of its 388 recipients have gone on to win the Nobel Prize. Dr. Lewis Kay, a Professor in the […]

Is International CRISPR Regulation a Pipe Dream?

Is International CRISPR Regulation a Pipe Dream?

Written by Shawn Xiong Edited by Manisha Talukdar Header image courtesy of Marie Ann Liebert At the dawn of recombinant DNA technology in the early 1970s, two conferences took place in Asilomar state beach in California, led by Stanford biochemist Paul Berg. From an outright […]

#SupportTheReport

#SupportTheReport

written by Anastassia Pogoutse The Naylor Report, summarized by Andrew Zhai in this post, provides a recipe for reinvigorating Canadian research. However, without concrete action by the federal government, the Naylor Report’s recommendations will be nothing but text. Canadian scientists have taken to using the […]

Seeing the Invisible: The First North American Electron Microscope

Seeing the Invisible: The First North American Electron Microscope

This is post 1 of 3 in the series “The Cabinet Project” Written by Anastassia Pogoutse The electron microscope (EM) is used for everything from looking for fault lines in engine parts to determining protein structures. In addition to its myriad functions, this powerful tool […]

Dust Counters and Gas Collectors

Dust Counters and Gas Collectors

This is post 2 of 3 in the series “The Cabinet Project” Written by Aidan Tomlinson Nicole Liao is a Toronto based artist with a background in Print Media and  Architecture. A large part of her work is made up of representations attempting to map, […]

Mud

Mud

This is post 3 of 3 in the series “The Cabinet Project” Written by Louis Ho Nicole Clousten is a practice-based researcher at York University and an artist at the Coalesce BioArt Lab at the University of Buffalo. Her cabinet, Mud, is an ominous display […]

Notes on the Naylor Report: The Document That Will Try to Rescue Canadian Science from the Abyss

Notes on the Naylor Report: The Document That Will Try to Rescue Canadian Science from the Abyss

written by Andrew Zhai If you scroll down you’ll find that Transcripts has devoted a significant amount of page-space to the March for Science. Seeing such a diverse group of people all gathered to support scientific research, to support what you do, was life-affirming. Dare […]

Transcripts at the Toronto March for Science

Transcripts at the Toronto March for Science

written by Andrew Zhai photos by Rebecca Li Last weekend, hundreds of thousands of scientists and science-allies gathered in cities all over the world for the March for Science. The goal? To get “political leaders and policymakers to enact evidence-based policies in the public interest.” Surely […]